Flossmoor Station Looking To Expand?

In Beer News by Ryan

Is Flossmoor Station looking for a new space for a production facility? Tucked into an interesting Times of Northwest Indiana piece on development plans for a former crime-ridden apartment complex in Hammond, Indiana is this nugget.

The city received three proposals, including a restaurant and brewery from the owners of the Flossmoor Station Restaurant and Brewery in Flossmoor…

According to the article, the brewing operation in Flossmoor is at capacity so they’re looking to expand.

A production brewery and restaurant would be on tap for Hammond if Flossmoor’s bid is accepted.

The parent company of Flossmoor Station bid $996,996 for 7 acres with hopes to build a production brewery and restaurant, said owner Carolyn Armstrong.

While expanding into Hammond, the restaurant would maintain its Flossmoor location where it’s served up house-made beer and food inside a renovated train station for 17 years. The brewery is at maximum production at the Flossmoor site and a new production facility would allow the company to send more of its beer out to distributors, Armstrong said.

City staff will review all the proposals, which also include a veterinary clinic and something likened to a Mars Cheese Castle, and will make a recommendation on which to accept.

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Ryan

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Equal parts beer nerd and policy geek, Ryan is now the curator of the Guys Drinking Beer cellar. The skills he once used to dig through the annals of state government as a political reporter are now put to use offering unique takes on barrel-aged stouts, years-old barleywines and 10 + year verticals.